Author Guideslines

Al Kamal: Journal of Islamic and Social Studies [JISS], published three times a year since 1994, is a bilingual (English and Arabic), peer-reviewed journal, and specializes in Indonesian Islamic studies in particular and Southeast Asian Islamic studies in general. The aim is to provide readers with a better understanding of Indonesia and Southeast Asia’s Muslim history and present developments through the publication of articles, research reports, and book reviews.

The journal invites scholars and experts working in all disciplines in the humanities and social sciences pertaining to Islam or Muslim societies. Articles should be original, research-based, unpublished and not under review for possible publication in other journals. All submitted papers are subject to review of the editors, editorial board, and blind reviewers. Submissions that violate our guidelines on formatting or length will be rejected without review.

Articles should be written in American English between approximately 10.000-15.000 words including text, all tables and figures, notes, references, and appendices intended for publication. All submission must include 150 words abstract and 5 keywords. Quotations, passages, and words in local or foreign languages should be translated into English. Studia Islamika accepts only electronic submissions. Therefore, authors must log in before submit their article. Please click here to log in.

All notes must appear in the text as citations. A citation usually requires only the last name of the author(s), year of publication, and (sometimes) page numbers. For example: (Hefner, 2009a: 45; Geertz, 1966: 114). Explanatory footnotes may be included but should not be used for simple citations. All works cited must appear in the reference list at the end of the article. In matter of bibliographical style, Studia Islamika follows the American political science association (APSA) manual style, such as below:

  1. Hefner, Robert, 2009a. “Introduction: The Political Cultures of Islamic Education in Southeast Asia,” in Making Modern Muslims: The Politics of Islamic Education in Southeast Asia, ed. Robert Hefner, Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press.
  2. Booth, Anne. 1988. “Living Standards and the Distribution of Income in Colonial Indonesia: A Review of the Evidence.” Journal of Southeast Asian Studies19(2): 310–34.
  3. Feener, Michael R., and Mark E. Cammack, eds. 2007. Islamic Law in Contemporary Indonesia: Ideas and Institutions. Cambridge: Islamic Legal Studies Program.
  4. Wahid, Din, 2014. Nurturing Salafi Manhaj: A Study of Salafi Pesantrens in Contemporary Indonesia. PhD dissertation. Utrecht University.
  5. Utriza, Ayang, 2008. “Mencari Model Kerukunan Antaragama.” Kompas. March 19: 59.
  6. Undhang-Undhang Banten, L.Or.5598, Leiden University.
  7. Interview with K.H. Sahal Mahfudz, Kajen, Pati, June 11th, 2007.